Faculty and Staff

Fr. Daniel Moloney, Ph.D.

Visiting Professor of Theology

Fr. Daniel Moloney, Ph.D.

Visiting Professor of Theology
fr.moloney@augustine.edu

Fr. Moloney is a priest for the Archdiocese of Boston. Before his ordination in 2010, he taught in the Department of Philosophy at Notre Dame, was a lecturer in the Department of Politics at Princeton, worked at think tanks in Princeton, Washington, D.C., and New York, and from 1998 to 2001 served as the associate editor of First Things.

Fr. Moloney wrote his dissertation on the topic of mercy as it appears in ancient times, in medieval natural theology (especially St. Anselm of Canterbury), in contemporary political philosophy, and in contemporary theories of criminal punishment. His research and teaching interests are in soteriology, Christian anthropology and the human person (especially as the subject of holiness), anger (and the role of the passions more broadly), divine and human justice, pastoral theology—basically anything that involves “righting wrongs” (the scope of the virtue of mercy).

His most recent publication is Mercy: What Every Catholic Should Know (Ignatius Press; Augustine Institute, 2020).

To learn more about Fr. Moloney and his work, visit his blog Spiritual Directions.

fr.moloney@augustine.edu

Biography

Fr. Moloney is a priest for the Archdiocese of Boston. Before his ordination in 2010, he taught in the Department of Philosophy at Notre Dame, was a lecturer in the Department of Politics at Princeton, worked at think tanks in Princeton, Washington, D.C., and New York, and from 1998 to 2001 served as the associate editor of First Things.

Fr. Moloney wrote his dissertation on the topic of mercy as it appears in ancient times, in medieval natural theology (especially St. Anselm of Canterbury), in contemporary political philosophy, and in contemporary theories of criminal punishment. His research and teaching interests are in soteriology, Christian anthropology and the human person (especially as the subject of holiness), anger (and the role of the passions more broadly), divine and human justice, pastoral theology—basically anything that involves “righting wrongs” (the scope of the virtue of mercy).

His most recent publication is Mercy: What Every Catholic Should Know (Ignatius Press; Augustine Institute, 2020).

To learn more about Fr. Moloney and his work, visit his blog Spiritual Directions.

Education

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Courses

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Biography

Fr. Moloney is a priest for the Archdiocese of Boston. Before his ordination in 2010, he taught in the Department of Philosophy at Notre Dame, was a lecturer in the Department of Politics at Princeton, worked at think tanks in Princeton, Washington, D.C., and New York, and from 1998 to 2001 served as the associate editor of First Things.

Fr. Moloney wrote his dissertation on the topic of mercy as it appears in ancient times, in medieval natural theology (especially St. Anselm of Canterbury), in contemporary political philosophy, and in contemporary theories of criminal punishment. His research and teaching interests are in soteriology, Christian anthropology and the human person (especially as the subject of holiness), anger (and the role of the passions more broadly), divine and human justice, pastoral theology—basically anything that involves “righting wrongs” (the scope of the virtue of mercy).

His most recent publication is Mercy: What Every Catholic Should Know (Ignatius Press; Augustine Institute, 2020).

To learn more about Fr. Moloney and his work, visit his blog Spiritual Directions.

Education

  • STB Theology, Pontifical University Holy Cross (2007)
  • MA and PhD Philosophy, University of Notre Dame (2004)
  • BA Religious Studies, Yale University (1994)

Courses

  • Christian Anthropology
  • The Spiritual Life: Theology for Christian Perfection
fr.moloney@augustine.edu
The Augustine Institute Graduate School is committed to the pursuit of wisdom in service of Catholic mission. All of our academic programs therefore seek, first, to allow students to make their own “all the treasures of wisdom and knowledge” (Col. 2:3), which are found in Christ and passed down in the Sacred Tradition of the Catholic Church. Second, our programs prepare students to hand these treasures on to others effectively through evangelization and catechesis.